About Freeman Safaris

Freeman Safaris are designed to satisfy the desire to get off the beaten track to see the great animals of the Kenyan plains, the wonders of the Masai Mara migration and the big cats. Based in our exclusively located camps right in the heart of the National Parks, we spend full days following the activity from the moment we wake at first light. With no fences and perched on the riverbank, dozens of hippos are literally on our doorstep. African birdlife is plentiful as are close up encounters with animals throughout the day.

Wildlife enthusiasts and photographers alike will appreciate our dedication to providing the best viewing experience possible. Our experienced, dedicated Masai trackers who are your guides throughout your stay, understand the rhythm of the Mara and its animals. This ensures you are taken closer to the action, wherever it happens in the comfort and safety of our customized vehicles.

A common complaint of those who have been on ‘ordinary’ safaris is that much of the time is spent in camp and too little time is spent with the game and allowing situations to develop. We spend up to ten hours with the game each day. This gives us the opportunity to see a large number of species and to follow the unfolding story of wildlife on the plains as it happens. This is why our guests always come back – 80% return again and again and almost everybody refers Freeman Safaris to their friends!

Freeman Safaris runs a fleet of customised Landrover Defenders and Discoveries, the ideal vehicles for crossing river beds and negotiating the terrain in complete safety. The vehicles have been optimised to provide the best facilities for viewing and photographing the game. Freeman Safaris have also added a special photo vehicle for the dedicated wildlife photographer.

Our unfenced camps provide great comfort in our high quality, spacious tents, complete with integrated stoned bathrooms with hot and cold running water and electricity for lights and charging all devices.  Excellent food prepared by our trained chef and kitchen team is served in the mess tent and on the banks of the river when in camp, and in delicious hampers when exploring the Mara. Our camps, situated well into the National Parks give an authentic experience of the safaris of old whilst providing all modern conveniences. Come and join me on safari for an incredible wildlife experience that you will never forget!

Brian Freeman
Brian Freeman

Brian Freeman was born in a small town on the shores of Lake Victoria, only the 3rd white baby to be born there. Brian was very fortunate to be, quite literally, brought up in the bush. As a child Brian learnt Swahili alongside English, and lived for 3 years under canvas as well as in a variety of remote bush houses. Brian had a remarkable childhood spending months at a time on extended safaris with his parents who were involved in Game protection – a safari in those days was a real journey, often without an end date.

Brian can still remember camping on the banks of the Ruaha river waiting almost 3 weeks for new tyres as unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately!) a sharp root had burst a tyre and thorns had reduced the tubes in 3 months to such a state there were more holes than rubber! Brian can also recall to this very day, how his father shot from the river bank a charging hippo which was about to kill a local fisherman in his dugout canoe mid river, no room for error, and there was none! Brian’s father taught him the same skills which have remained with him ever since, but he must confess he would prefer to shoot with his camera now.

Living off the bush by the river was fun and was no different to cooking at our remote houses. After boarding school Brian joined the Royal Engineers serving in a number of trouble spots around the world. Leaving the armed forces, he pursued a career as a consultant in survival and adventure training in remote areas, including the most remote parts of Kenya. Brian was also involved preparing vehicles for overland travel, having personally crossed Africa twice by Landrover.

Brian Freeman

Brian Freeman was born in a small town on the shores of Lake Victoria, only the 3rd white baby to be born there. Brian was very fortunate to be, quite literally, brought up in the bush. As a child Brian learnt Swahili alongside English, and lived for 3 years under canvas as well as in a variety of remote bush houses. Brian had a remarkable childhood spending months at a time on extended safaris with his parents who were involved in Game protection – a safari in those days was a real journey, often without an end date.

Brian can still remember camping on the banks of the Ruaha river waiting almost 3 weeks for new tyres as unfortunately (or perhaps fortunately!) a sharp root had burst a tyre and thorns had reduced the tubes in 3 months to such a state there were more holes than rubber! Brian can also recall to this very day, how his father shot from the river bank a charging hippo which was about to kill a local fisherman in his dugout canoe mid river, no room for error, and there was none! Brian’s father taught him the same skills which have remained with him ever since, but he must confess he would prefer to shoot with his camera now.

Living off the bush by the river was fun and was no different to cooking at our remote houses. After boarding school Brian joined the Royal Engineers serving in a number of trouble spots around the world. Leaving the armed forces, he pursued a career as a consultant in survival and adventure training in remote areas, including the most remote parts of Kenya. Brian was also involved preparing vehicles for overland travel, having personally crossed Africa twice by Landrover.

Grandparents
The Freemans

Brian’s parents spent all their lives in the bush working with wild animals, filming and producing the first ever wildlife movie. They were passionate about protecting, capturing and breeding animals, and opened up the country for other travellers. A hard, but fantastic life. At that time photography was extremely difficult and unfortunately zoos had a very important part to play. Brian’s family believed that, as capturing and breeding for preservation had to be done, it should be done humanely. They were therefore best suited to do this, as the animals were their passion.

It was an extremely dangerous and very difficult, arduous occupation which included delivering the animals around the world – a responsibility they would not delegate. The Freemans always stayed until they were sure the new owners were capable of looking after the animals well, which always resulted in a very difficult and emotional departure.

The Freemans

Brian’s parents spent all their lives in the bush working with wild animals, filming and producing the first ever wildlife movie. They were passionate about protecting, capturing and breeding animals, and opened up the country for other travellers. A hard, but fantastic life. At that time photography was extremely difficult and unfortunately zoos had a very important part to play. Brian’s family believed that, as capturing and breeding for preservation had to be done, it should be done humanely. They were therefore best suited to do this, as the animals were their passion.

It was an extremely dangerous and very difficult, arduous occupation which included delivering the animals around the world – a responsibility they would not delegate. The Freemans always stayed until they were sure the new owners were capable of looking after the animals well, which always resulted in a very difficult and emotional departure.